Profession Karma raises $10M to link students to coding bootcamps

Profession Karma raises $10M to link students to coding bootcamps

As edtech produce increasingly more MasterClass copycats and coding bootcamps, it’s ending up being glaringly obvious that students require better ways to browse the congested world of online knowing. Profession Karma, established in 2018 by Ruben Harris, Artur Meyster and Timur Meyster, wants to assist. The start-up is bringing a pick-and-shovel play to the coding […] Career Karma is working in one of coding bootcamps’ blind spots. A typical review of coding bootcamps is that while they help trainees get their first job, the credential may not do as great of a task as a degree in future profession mobility. Currently, Career Karma only makes cash one method: it charges a charge to bootcamps when it successfully positions a student in one of their programs. The greatest hurdle for Profession Karma was stress-tested in the early innings of the pandemic: Because the startup is so carefully dependent on coding bootcamps doing well, what takes place to coding bootcamps in a bear market? While Harris declined to divulge specific figures, he did say that over the previous year, Career Karma has positioned more than 3,000 people into job-training programs….

Previous Stitch Repair COO Julie Bornstein simply took the wraps off her app-only e-commerce start-up, The Yes

Previous Stitch Repair COO Julie Bornstein simply took the wraps off her app-only e-commerce start-up, The Yes

After teasing the launch of their brand-new startup last year, e-commerce veteran Julie Bornstein and her technical co-founder, Amit Aggarwal, are today releasing The Yes, a ladies’s shopping platform that they have actually been silently developing for 18 months and they say will produce tailor-made experiences for each user, courtesy of its sophisticated algorithms. Bornstein’s experience and […] To learn more about how it breaks through in a world rife with e-commerce companies, we talked with Bornstein, who previously spent four years as COO of the styling service Stitch Repair and before that invested years as a C-level executive at Sephora. TC: You’re building what you call a store around each user, who downloads the app, responses concerns that supply a lot of “signal” about that individual’s design and brand name preferences and size and budget plan, and that’s adaptive, suggesting the algorithm is always re-ranking items as it learns better what a person likes. JB: We have 145 brand names at launch, varying from Gucci, Prada and Erdem to modern brands like Vince and Theory to direct-to-consumer brand names like Everlane and La Ligne to everyday brands like Levis. TC: You’re launching with approximately 150 brand names. Then the order is put through the brand and is delivered from the brand name to you….